Living Well Psychology

Living Well

What is cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)?

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) is a relatively short term, focused approach to the treatment of many types of emotional, behavioural and psychiatric problems. The application of CBT varies according to the problem being addressed, but is essentially a collaborative and individualised program that helps individuals to identify unhelpful thoughts and behaviours and learn or relearn healthier skills and habits. CBT has been practised widely for more than 30 years. It has been research extensively, and has demonstrated effectiveness with a variety of emotional psychological and psychiatric difficulties.

Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is a type of psychotherapy that helps people to change unhelpful or unhealthy thinking habits, feelings and behaviours. CBT may be used to treat problems including anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, anger, substance abuse, eating disorders and other problems. CBT involves the use of practical self-help strategies, which are designed to bring about positive and immediate changes in the person’s quality of life.

The benefits of CBT

  1. CBT has been extensively investigated in rigorous clinical trials and has empirical support.
  2. CBT is structured; goal oriented, and focuses on immediate difficulties as well as long term strategies and requires active involvement by the client.
  3. CBT is flexible, individualised, and can be adapted to a wide range of individuals and a variety of settings.

Further information about CBT